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The Wall Street Journal Interviews F.E.A.S.T. On Historic Genetic Research

The Wall Street Journal interviewed three of our advisors, Dr. Cynthia Bulik, Dr. Walter Kaye, and June Alexander, Ph.D. on the momentous research published in Nature Genetics on July 15, 2019. The study was led by F.E.A.S.T. Advisor Bulik and identified eight loci associated with anorexia nervosa. The research also offers clues that the origins of this serious disorder appear to be both metabolic and psychiatric.

“Only about 30% of people with anorexia nervosa fully recover. The research underscores the importance of ensuring that patients get to a healthy weight to allow their metabolism to stabilize before they leave residential treatment programs. This could reduce the risk of relapse after they go home.”   Bulik

F.E.A.S.T. Executive Director Laura Collins Lyster-Mensh also states,

“The DNA research reinforces what the families of FEAST have been saying for a long time, which is: Help us feed our kids properly and stop blaming our loved ones for choosing a disorder of vanity,” Ms. Lyster-Mensh says. “They didn’t choose it.”

To learn more about the study, please see the resources below:

Interview with Dr. Bulik, Erica Husain, and Dr. Breen
When the study was released family, friends, and loved ones had many questions. Dr. Bulik,  Erica Husain, former Chair for F.E.A.S.T. and Charlotte’s Helix in the UK, and Dr. Gerome Breen, from Kings College London graciously spent time with Lyster-Mensh to answer some of these questions in this recent interview.

Research Paper: Genome-wide association study identifies eight risk loci and implicates
metabo-ps
ychiatric origins for anorexia nervosa
Four-Part Blog Series by Dr. Cynthia Bulik
Part 1: Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative (ANGI): The Results
Part 2: Anorexia Nervosa Genetics Initiative (ANGI): The Process
Part 3: The Future of Genetic Research on Eating Disorders (ANGI): An Interview with Patrick Sullivan, MD, FRANZCP
Part 4: Personal Reflections and What the ANGI Results Mean for Patients, Families, and Clinicians Today.

 

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