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Around the Dinner Table Forum Recent Threads

Is counseling really necessary?Open in a New Window

I am new to FEAST. Our (fairy new) counselor fired us today when we told her we would not see the (also fairly new) nutritionist anymore since it was a waste of our time & money. I am kind of done with all counselors, doctors & nutritionists anyway!  My daughter is 5’1”, weighs 102 pounds, is 14 3/4 years old. I refed her last summer from 74 pounds to 90 pounds. She hovered there for 8 months, then a month ago, I FINALLY went against dumb counselor, doctor & nutritionist advice & forced her to eat milk, cream & fat again & got her to gain up to 102 pounds. She is FINALLY back to being herself. … most of the time. It is so miraculous to see the transformation, I cry every time I see her being playful with her little sister like she used to be. 
I am now in the phase of reintroducing other forbidden foods. I love Eva Musby’s book, “Anorexia & Other Eating Disorders" Chapter 8 has saved me many times with all her scenarios of how a meal might go. Anyway, question is: Is counseling REALLY necessary? 
Thanks so much!
Cheryl, AKA a fellow Lorenzo’s Oil Mom

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'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Allowing menu choices, yes or no?Open in a New Window

We were just wondering whether we should allow our D any choices about menu items during the redeeming process, as long as they would contain enough calories?
Also, the more I read, the more confusing this disease gets. How do I correct and handle outbursts when I know the main cause is biological?
Thanks so much,
The K’s

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'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Talking about Suicide!Open in a New Window

My daughter who is about 3 weeks into the refeeding, is now talking about suicide and that we(my wife and I) are ruining her life by making her eat.  
Do we back off a bit, or just keep a close watch on her and keep moving forward with the refeeding?

Appreciate any input and advice.

The K's

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'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Take bedroom door off?Open in a New Window

We have caught our 14 yr old D continuing to exercise in her room, running in place, crunches, squats, etc.  We have told her that if she continue to exercise against our commands, then we will have to take her door off of the hinges.  Is this an acceptable move on our part?

Thanks,

The K's

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'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Any other success with Sensoril?Open in a New Window

I had a very nice response from someone on this forum who went into detail about the supplements that they found to be somewhat helpful for their child while going through the AN healing process.   One they mentioned was Sensoril, which is a natural calmative supplement.  Does anyone else have any information or experience with this supplement?

Thanks again,

The K's

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Out of nowhere!Open in a New Window

Hi again,

My 16 yr s with AN has been doing okay with food for a long while over 9 weeks. I posted a few days ago that he has the last weeks of school so under a lot of pressure in that respect. Last night we sat to dinner and we had ravoli - which he said said was disgusting and tasted like vomit. Then went on to tell me how I prepare the food is so gross with too much butter. He also said he doesnt like anything he eats except burritos.

He refused to eat the ravoli and went on about how he cant wait to get out of this house so he has total control over everything.

I was completely unprepared for this last night and quite shaken up by it. I am going to go ahead and guess that the stress of school is a trigger for the ed behaviors?

Anyone experience this type of behavior out of the blue?

Thanks so much.
Mbsmom

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'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Refusing her mealOpen in a New Window

Hi,
I just need some advice.
Just tried to serve my daughter lunch but she is refusing to come to the dinner table (we had the same thing for lunch yesterday, which she ate).
Do I keep insisting and if she dowsn't eat it serve it for dinner?
I'm going out of my mind. She had been doing well the last couple of weeks after barely finishing a meal for the two weeks prior. 
I noticed this morning that today is a tough day for her.
Unfortunately it has become clear early on that the more we push, the more stubborn she is but I'm afraid that if I give in we'll never get ahead. Besides that I don't know what else to offer her. It is very difficult to get everything she needs into a meal when she's still determined to keep going with her vegan diet.
Help.

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'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Sleep overs allowed?Open in a New Window

Hi,

We are only about 3 weeks into refeeding and of course, it's had it's ups, but mostly downs so far.  We are on a pretty tight schedule, food wise, and are making sure that our D is getting the calories and nutrients that she needs.

However, she asked us about sleeping over sometime at a friend's house.  We weren't sure how we would manage her food schedule if she wasn't at our house.  

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

The K's

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Vitamin supplementation prevents anorexia?Open in a New Window

Has anyone else come across this article?  Appreciate any feedback. Thanks so much.

The K's

Vitamin Supplementation Prevents Anorexia

(OMNS February 9, 2008) Anorexia is primarily due to vitamin deficiency. Approximately one in twenty teenage girls in America is struggling with an eating disorder. Parents can help eliminate the risk of anorexia by providing their children with vitamin supplements.

Anorexia is an acknowledged clinical marker of beriberi, the disease specifically caused by a deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine). Anorexia is also commonly observed as an early symptom of pellagra (niacin deficiency) and is a known complication of scurvy, vitamin C deficiency. Prevention is especially important, because beriberi/anorexia often does not respond well even to treatment with high doses of thiamine for months, and sometimes does not respond at all. But as a rule, high potency vitamin supplements are an effective cure for the loss of muscle mass caused by beriberi and the skin lesions caused by pellagra.

The vitamin B1 in almost every multivitamin and B-complex vitamin pill is either thiamine mononitrate or thiamine hydrochloride. The body’s ability to absorb these two forms of thiamine is limited by the maximum amount that can be handled by the body’s two specialized thiamine transport proteins. . This means many doses per day of oral thiamine are necessary for effective treatment. Another class of thiamine molecules, called allithiamines, are much better absorbed. Since allithiamines are not included in standard multivitamin preparations, we recommend their reformulation to include this specific form of B1.

The conventional medical approach to eating disorders such as anorexia typically includes psychological/behavioral treatment, medication, and food-groups dietetics. It is surprisingly rare for physicians to link eating disorders with vitamin deficiency, and few doctors recommend vitamin supplements for prevention.

Dieting without supplementation causes vitamin deficiency, and vitamin deficiency can lead to anorexia. Dieting is the number one cause of vitamin/mineral deficiency in America. Deficiency is entirely preventable with nutrition supplements. A fraction of the population is more prone to becoming thiamine deficient while dieting due to genetic conditions associated with proteins that bind thiamine . The risk of thiamine deficiency is also increased by eating processed foods. A high intake of simple carbohydrates requires increased thiamine intake. Vitamin and mineral supplements contain no calories, and do not cause weight loss nor weight gain. They do help promote normal appetite.

Harold Foster, PhD writes: 
"In both open and closed trials in sub-Saharan Africa, mixtures of nutrients were given to HIV-positive patients, some of whom were in the late stages of AIDS. Even just twice the US RDA of ascorbic acid and four times the US RDA for thiamine resulted in improvements of appetite . . . after only a few days of supplementation."

Erik Paterson, MD, writes: 
"Many years ago, an emaciated, teenage girl was made to come to see me by her worried parents because of her revulsion against food. She admitted that she hardly ate anything, but explained that she felt that she was fat: a typical case of anorexia nervosa. I tried to persuade her to eat right. She adamantly refused. So I made a deal with her. I pointed out that by not eating she was making herself malnourished with respect to vitamins. The deal was that I would not pester her to eat if she would take vitamin pills, specifically vitamin C and B-complex vitamins. She agreed. Two weeks later she and her parents returned to tell me that she had developed a strong appetite. After another month, her emaciation was clearly disappearing. She never became anorexic again."

A well-formulated daily multivitamin supplement, at least 1,000 mg per day of vitamin C, plus additional B-vitamins will greatly reduce the incidence of anorexia and other eating disorders. If you are helping to care for a family member with anorexia, and your physician didn’t recommend vitamin supplements, get a second opinion.

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Advice with GP negligence (UK)Open in a New Window

Hi I’ve posted last year when my dd was in a bad place and sadly I’m back again Just to give a quick update my dd is now 20 and hit a very dark place this time last year but managed to turn it around. Sadly she’s had a rough time at uni and has relapsed again. She’s now at a bmi of 15.
She decided to go to her GP today to get a reality check on how much she has damaged herself in hopes of kick starting her recovery, however this is the complete opposite of what happened.

All she wanted was blood tests, ecg and blood pressure done. The GP weighed her, checked her chest and completely fobbed her off. She told the GP all the (very worrying symptoms) she had in the past two months which include, sharp chest pains on and off, shortness of breath, unable to digest food, acid reflux 24/7, loss of sensation in finger tips and upper legs on and off. Her stomach looks 6 months pregnant just by drinking a small amount of water. Her GP did not care! Told her she had panic disorder and not an eating disorder even though she is diagnosed with Anorexia! Did not care that she has a bmi of 15!!!! Because she’s had a lower BMI previously told her simply to “stop making yourself sick” after my dd confessed of purging on average three times a day (she clearly has a problem and telling her off won’t help)

My dd has done a complete 180 and gone from wanting to recover to never eating again. It’s so hard to deal with this illness when your child is an adult as you have no parental rights and they are their own person. I was wondering if anyone in the UK has dealt with this kind of disgusting treatment and what’s the best course of action to take?

I thought CAMHS was bad enough I really do not expect medical professionals to further trigger a very vunrable young person

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

ANOpen in a New Window



Our daughter of 19 yrs was hospitalised(inpatient) with AN at 16 , and was re-admitted after she turned 18, then discharged and  is home with my wife and I.

 

The questions I have are:

*D seems to have negotiated with her Dr to maintain a “safe” weight for her(due to privacy laws, we don’t know our daughter’s weight, have no access to her Dr or Counsellor, without her consent, which she refuses to give.

* Re blood tests, as per an ED conference source, it seems that ED can steal from the body to give a Dr the false impression that the bloods are normal. Does that apply until weight is fully restored(percentile weight?), or not?

*is one hour of private counselling(trained in ED) a week going to cut it?

 

I listened to the ANZAED webinar with Drs Hill and Peck May 17, which was encouraging on the one hand, although we lack the funding to bring it here to New Zealand.

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Decoding Anorexia: How Breakthroughs in Science Offer Hope for Eating DisordeOpen in a New Window

Has anyone else reD this book and if so, have you found any of the information useful in your treatment?

Thanks so much,

The K’s

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Chidren and adolescent anorexia - great articleOpen in a New Window

https://www.eatingdisorderhope.com/treatment-for-eating-disorders/special-issues/teen-adolescent-children/she-is-so-young

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

ED, suicidality, self harm...omg!!Open in a New Window

Hello all,
I have not posted myself in a long time though have been reading a lot. Not sure if I have a true question but could really use any advice anyone may have to offer....
brief (as possible) history....15 year old daughter diagnosed with restricting AN at age 12.  WR (yes fully so) through a hospital stay and subsequent home feeding fairly quickly (30-40 lb weight gain).  self harm and suicidality have kept her in one program or another for the past year and a half.  her ED symptoms have popped up periodically resulting in frequent trips to the hospital and a lengthy stay at Sick Kids last summer to regain medical stability....she become tachycardic quickly when she stops eating.  We (her current care team in secure treatment and the family) have determined that her eating stoppage starts as a way to self harm but quickly gets out of her control as ED thoughts start to take over.  We are once again in the beginnings of a self imposed hunger strike (behaviour) which I feel very certain will once again get out of her control and will result in a hospital visit.
Not sure what my questions are except, has anyone else out there had a similar experience where their child got to fully weight restored (yes I am very certain of this) and then started to display suicidality/self harming behaviour and then ED recurrence?  I am really struggling lately to find hope and answers and just wanting to save my kid's life and truly don't know which came first ED or thoughts of suicide.  She displayed signs of social anxiety prior to ED symptoms, in fact we feel this anxiety may be what brought on the ED. We have gotten so very close to better and coming home so many times and then something happens to trigger an incident of severe self harm or eating issues. It is getting hard to find the hope though I am hanging on by a thread....
Thoughts?  Thanks 

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers

 

Answers to Anorexia by James Greenblatt, MDOpen in a New Window

Hi,

I found a very interesting book that basically says that in order to heal from Anorexia, the brain must heal, and that can really only happen with the proper supplements, vitamins, minerals, probiotics, etc.

Has anyone else taken this approach, and if so, did you find it helpful?  It makes sense to me, as I have studied a lot of nutrition, due to my being a chiropractor for a living.  But I was just wondering if anyone else has tried this approach and if so, what were the results?

Thanks so much to everyone!

The K's

Category:

'Around the Dinner Table' Online Forum for Parents and Carers


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